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Period power: Supporting young people with periods during physical activity

Talking about periods may seem like a daunting prospect, especially if you don’t menstruate. However, offering your support to those who menstruate, and considering their specific needs during sport and physical activity, can make a positive difference to young people’s participation and enjoyment. 

N.b. this article was originally published for those working with young people in the outdoor activity space. www.balanceisbetter.org.nz believe the article’s messages are important for adults working in the youth sport context. As such we have adapted the original article, which can be read here 

As coaches and practitioners working in the youth sport and physical activity space, we are used to considering the needs of the young people we work with. We work hard to ensure they have positive, enjoyable, and meaningful experiences in their chosen sport/s and physical activities. However, there may be one area of physical activity practice and culture that requires further attention. I’m talking about… periods!   

Research shows that for some young people, having their period is a significant barrier to their participation and enjoyment in sport1, 2 and physical activity3, 4, 5 Although many tamariki and rangitahi are taught about menstruation at school (although, often only female students), the information they are given tends to focus on the biology of menstruation and doesn’t address how to manage periods during sport or physical activity (particularly when they’re in the outdoors). The secrecy and shame associated with menstruation often means that young people aren’t given adequate support to manage their period.  

Rangatahi are increasingly open about their menstruation experiences and needs, and want their teachers and outdoor leaders to feel comfortable having open, respectful and supportive conversations with them about periods. Some young people have painful or heavy periods, which can affect their mood and physical ability. Others experience minor symptoms. There is no ‘right way’ to manage your period. It’s important follow the lead of each young person – they know their body best.  

“My period can affect my participation in sport…usually when I’m on my period I quite often feel hot, faint and sick.”

Young Samoan/Pākehā woman 

“Sometimes having my period is an unintended blessing. When I hike with my period, I generally take it easier on myself – I slow down a bit more and spend more time ‘still’. Doing this can help me to enjoy my surroundings even more.”  

Adult Pākehā woman

Talking about periods may seem like a daunting prospect, especially if you don’t menstruate. However, offering your support to those who menstruate, and considering their specific needs during sport and physical activities, can make a positive difference to young people’s participation and enjoyment.  

“Menstruation isn’t something to be sorry or ashamed about”

Young Samoan woman

“I wish someone had told me that having your period in the outdoors is ok and normal. And that you’ll be able to manage it…”

Young Pākehā woman

So, what can you do to support young people who might be menstruating? 

  • Upskill yourself: Think about the challenges menstruators might experience in your sport/activity and identify ways to manage them. Learn about the different periods management strategies that people use, so you can share them with others. Ask for help if you need it.  
  • Think about language: How you talk about periods and gender has a big impact on people’s perceptions and behaviours. Use positive or neutral language when talking about periods. Remember that not all girls menstruate, and not everyone who menstruates is a girl. Use inclusive language when addressing groups (for example, using ‘team’, ‘folks’, ‘whānau’, or ‘people’, instead of ‘guys’), and learn how to say ‘period’ in different languages – ‘ikura’ is one of the Māori words for period.  
  • Create safe and open spaces for young people to talk about their experiences or ask for help. This means talking about periods in a positive and empowering way in front of the whole group to normalise it. Role model supportive behaviours, for example by showing empathy if someone is experiencing painful cramps and needs to walk more slowly. If someone in the group makes a negative or harmful comment, make sure you address it.  
  • Consider facilities and equipment: If you’re participating in activities in remote places, think about what toileting facilities are available. Share with the group where the toilets are (i.e., how many hours away). If there aren’t any available, create a private place for people to change their period products (for example by bringing a tarp/sarong that people can change behind). It’s also a good idea to create a ‘group period kit’ or carry spare period products. Make sure you talk about what’s in the kit (and how to use it). Talk about it the same way you would a first-aid kit.  

Coaches and practitioners working in the youth sport and physical activity space must play a key role in the changing the perceptions and practices of menstruation. By learning about, providing for, and celebrating menstruation, – sport and active recreation will become a space where all our young people can thrive.  


Education Outdoors New Zealand has released a resource called Going with the flow: Menstruation and rainbow-inclusive practices in the outdoors. The resource aims to inspire positive changes to outdoor practice and culture. It includes information about diverse experiences of menstruation (including rainbow perspectives), practical tips and advice, lesson plans suitable to use with young people, and a four-part video series. Coaches and practitioners working in the youth sport will also benefit from these resources. 

You can access the resource at https://www.eonz.org.nz/menstruation-and-rainbow-inclusive-practices/  

Image Source: Canva

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